• Michael Krueger

    The Optimism of Trees
    Michael Krueger
    We are happy to feature to recent paintings by Michael Krueger in this edition of CT Feature.
     
    Cate McQuaid, in her Paradise exhibition review in The Boston Globe writes:
    "And in Michael Krueger's "The Optimism of Trees," paint sculpted into fruit tree blossoms pop against a vaporous sunset sky, some blushing shamelessly in shades of coral and pink. Paradise. ….Krueger….. paintings were all finished in 2020. It warmed me just to imagine the painters continuing to create - like a fruit tree - as we gritted our teeth through the last year. Art and creation still matter. Beauty is a salvation. We go on.
     
    Grounded firmly in drawing, Michael Krueger works in a variety of media including, painting, drawing, printmaking, animation, and ceramics. His ideas dictate the media and he floats freely between them. Krueger's artwork reflects a deep interest in American history, contemporary American culture, art history, the human experience, natural phenomena and personal memoir.
     
    Michael Krueger's recent solo exhibitions include venues such as Sunday L.E.S., New York, NY, Blackburn 20/20, New York, NY and the Dolphin Gallery, KCMO. Important group exhibitions include, The Drawing Center, New York, KRETS Gallery, Malmo, Sweden, The Denver Museum of Art, Denver,  Ambacher Contemporary, Munich, Germany, Glasgow Print Studio, Scotland,  Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum, Philadelphia,  and the Kala Art Institute, Berkeley.
     
    Collections include Museum of Fine Arts, Boston,  Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson, RISD Museum, Providence,  and the New York Public Library and Private Collections.
  • Nancy Friese

    Long Summer Light
    Nancy Friese
  • Orit Hofshi

    Time...thou ceaseless lackey to eternity
    Orit Hofshi
    Orit Hofshi (Israeli, b. 1959) born in a Kabbutz Matzurva, located in Western Galilee in Israel and she continues to live and work in Herzliya, Israel.  The brief birth and history of Israel, has no doubt, influenced her haunting and powerful work created using printmaking, specifically woodcut and drawing.  On a personal level, Orit Hofshi's mother and father met each other in their youth while escaping the Nazi's forced division and partial incorporation into Nazi Germany of their homeland of Czechoslovakia during World War II.  
     
    Time….thou Ceaseless Lackey to Eternity 2017, a monumental woodcut with rubbing and colored pencil on handmade Kozo, measuring 80 x 166 inches depicts 6 figures in the landscape, each with a variety of movement and tasks at hand.  Three figures are shown in a shallow pool of water, two walk away into the distance, and in the foreground a powerful woman stares directly at the viewer. In Hofshi's work, there exists a haunting reference to time as well as a relationship between nature and social occurrences.
     
    Hofshi writes: "The landscapes are typically proposed as places, occupied and unoccupied, touched and untouched, rarely fully committed in a specific context. In such dramatic natural contexts I find an emphasized sense of evolution, time and struggles, not only as records of natural phenomenon but also as reflections of human history."
     
    Orit Hofshi first studied at the Wizo College of Design and continued her studies majoring in painting and printmaking at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) 1990 in Philadelphia. She received her MA (2002) from Leeds University, United Kingdom.  Her work is in the collections of numerous museums among them The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Israel Museum, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Museum, The Open Museum, Tean, Haifa Museum of Art and others.
     
  • Donnamaria Bruton

    Edward's Memorial II
    Donnamaria Bruton
    Donnamaria Bruton's long horizontal painting Memorial for Edward II 1995, lays out a decorative and festooned coffin-shaped painting and collage with one arm or leg appearing in the bottom portion while a table prepared for afternoon tea.
     
    Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Donnamaria Bruton grew up in Detroit, and graduated from Michigan State University in 1976 where she earned her BFA in Graphic Design. After graduation, Bruton continued her art career by studying art with her uncle, painter Edward Loper, Sr. in Wilmington, Delaware. During this time, Bruton often visited the collection of art in the famous Barnes Foundation to study the collection. Founded by Albert C. Barnes in 1922, the collection holds some of the most seminal works by Matisse, Cézanne, Renoir and Modigliani as well as important examples of African sculpture. Bruton's entree to the Barnes resulted in a lifelong reverence for the work of Pierre Bonnard, Henri Matisse and are among Bruton's greatest influences along with abstract painter Cy Twombly.
     
    Bruton continued her education and earned an MFA from Yale University in Painting and Printmaking in 1991. Between her MSU education and Yale, Bruton exhibited with pioneering African American gallerist Dell Pryor in Detroit. In 1993, she joined the Painting Department as Professor at the Rhode Island School of Design. Donnamaria Bruton's work has been included in numerous one-person and group exhibitions throughout the United States, including an early solo exhibition at Woman and Their Work, Austin, Texas as well as exhibiting abroad in Canada, Japan, France and Korean Biennial. Donnamaria Bruton's work is in the permanent collection of the Black Studies Gallery, University of Texas, Austin, Newport Art Museum, RISD Museum, Yale University Art Gallery and many private collections.
  • Bob Dilworth

    Maria
    Bob Dilworth

    Bob Dilworth’s painting Maria 2019-2020 wraps and enshrines a Black female figure which appears in double exposure with just her head coming through the layers of swirling paint, glitter and fabric. Is she a form of the Virgin Mary with her knowing gaze looking down upon the viewer?

     

    “My paintings employ an aesthetic gesture towards moments in history that run parallel to current times, often intersecting and exploring hidden and deeper meanings of my experience as an African American male.”

     

  • Daniel Heyman

    Janus: Kuya-Shonin
    Daniel Heyman

    Janus: Kuya-Shonin 2020

    gouache and pencil on handmade Mulberry paper

    75 x 57.5 inches

     

    Myths are important to us because they are a lasting and meaningful way to establish a time frame. It is a framework that helps us to understand existence. We do not consider myths at face value - no one believes in the Roman god Janus today - but we understand that life looks forward with innocence and backward with experience and hopefully with wisdom. --Daniel Heyman

  • Paradise

    Group Exhibitions
    Paradise

    Providence, Rhode Island, January 30, 2021 - Cade Tompkins Projects is pleased to present Paradise, a group exhibition of paintings, drawings and prints by Allison Bianco, Bob Dilworth, Donnamaria Bruton, Nancy Friese, Lois Harada, Daniel Heyman, Orit Hofshi, Justin Kim, Michael Krueger, Serena Perrone, and Thomas Sgouros.

     

    Each week, a new artwork from the exhibition will be highlighted here.

     

    The entire world, as of late, feels like a state of suspended animation due to the pandemic.  The pause and warping of time is deeply felt and has affected every person on the planet earth.  For many, nature has been critical to our very happiness and well being. During this cycle of renewal, regeneration, and repair, paradise is preserved in nature and in art in the hands of these outstanding artists.

     

    The process of creating art is a way of remembering and preserving.  Paradise in landscape typically shows us the outstanding bounty and beauty of nature as in the case of Nancy Friese’s monumental en plein air painting Long Light of Summer 2020.  Lush green pastures, large majestic trees and glowing wheat fields all combine to create a sense of grandeur and delight.  Michael Krueger’s The Owl and the Orchid and The Optimism of Trees 2020 refresh our weary psyche with vibrancy and hopefulness. Justin Kim’s The Garden, Deep Springs, CA 2020 employs bold strokes of color that illuminate and reflect the intense sunshine washing over barn buildings, chickens, rows of plants, with a view of a majestic tree and the California mountains.  Thomas Sgouros’ Remembered Landscape 2009 reminds us to look up at the vast arc of the sky.

     

    As counterpoint, Paradise can also be of the past and forgotten, albeit intensely felt by the humans that occupy that space. Works such as Orit Hofshi’s monumental woodcut Time…thou ceaseless lackey to eternity 2018 depict the historic nature of humans on the land where figures traverse wide expanses amid crumbling ruins and yellow lakes.  Bob Dilworth’s painting Maria 2019-2020 wraps and enshrines a Black female figure which appears in double exposure with just her head coming through the layers of swirling paint, glitter and fabric. Is she a form of the Virgin Mary with her knowing gaze looking down upon the viewer?  Daniel Heyman approaches the mythic figure in Janus Kuya-Shonin 2020, a large gouache and pencil drawing on handmade mulberry paper.  Heyman reflects upon his interest in Japanese sculpture from sacred Buddhist temples, specifically the Kuya-Shonin of Kyoto, and has combined ideas with the double-headed Janus. Janus, of Roman mythological realm, is both looking back in time and forward to the future.  Donnamaria Bruton’s long horizontal painting Memorial for Edward II 1995, lays out a decorative and festooned coffin-shaped painting and collage with one arm or leg appearing in the bottom portion while a table is laid out for tea and eating pleasures. Serena Perrone presents gum-bichromate prints set up in a circle on a wood structure in the work entitled Something is About to Happen 2016.  Symbols of trees, a human hand, and star forms all collide in dream-like colors. Allison Bianco’s melancholy Golden Hour 2020 captures the beauty of the sun on the rocks at the end of the day and the impending darkness of night fall in her new etching. Lois Harada monotype, entitled Meandering 2021, with hot foil stamped dragonflies speaks to the delicate nature of life.

     

    In Paradise, we remember that art is here to show us beauty and to preserve our memories of the most fleeting moments. 

  • Max Van Pelt

    What you find coming through
    Max Van Pelt

    What you find coming through, 2020

    gouache, India ink, walnut ink, soft pastel, coffee, colored pencil, graphite, watercolor Rives BFK paper, acrylic ink and paint

    35.5 x 53.75 inches

     

    In one of Max Van Pelt's most recent paintings, What you find coming through, the viewer encounters an ode to fractal geometry, landscape, and architecture.  The line work varies by intensity, color, medium, and perspective -  causing the painting to seemingly expand and contract simultaneously, shifting from a bird's eye view to a collapse of dimensional space.

     

    As Van Pelt explains, these abstractions are deliberately open windows by which each viewer may come to acknowledge simultaneity - in caution and accidents, tension and tenderness, polishing and incompletion, joyfulness and gravity, conflict and finding a way through. 

     

    Max Van Pelt graduated summa cum laude from Dartmouth College in 2011, where his work in sculpture and drawing was awarded the Jonathan B. Rintels Prize for the outstanding undergraduate thesis in the Humanities and Social Sciences.  Prior to discovering his artistic intentions, Max was an archer - a thirteen-time national champion and athlete on the United States World Team.  His interests are deeply rooted in our built environment, the human condition, and regularly exploring the outdoors as an experienced whitewater kayaker, oarsman, and avid mountain bicyclist.  His work has been featured in Art in America's The LookoutBig Red & Shiny, and on National Public Radio.

  • Dan Talbot

    Janitor
    Dan Talbot

    Dan Talbot, Janitor 2020, oil on board, 40 x 60 inches

     

    In this painting, Dan Talbot pictures a neighborhood urban view and then applies an overlay of abstraction that blends and fractures the scene.  The painterly application conflates the street, house, yard, cars, flagpole with a cosmic tangle of images of body parts, cartoon-like heads, birds and pure abstraction. Janitor is named after the song by the 80s post-punk band Suburban Lawns and acts as a visual response to the internal rhyming, with both sound and meaning. 

     

    "I'm just intuitively recording bits of information, how objects can be broken down into little bits of very specifically colored shapes, and how those shapes intersect and line up with each other. After a dozen or so sittings a scene emerges with much of the white underpainting left untouched." Dan Talbot

     

    Dan Talbot holds a BFA in Painting from the Rhode Island School of Design (1996) and received the prestigious Rome Prize for painting. Talbot attended the prestigious Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Skowhegan, Maine (1995). He is the recipient of a Rhode Island State Council for the Arts Fellowship Award in Painting and Merit Award in Painting. Residencies include Lijiang Studio Residency, Yunnan, China; Ucross Foundation, Wyoming; Virginia Center for the Creative Arts; and the MacDowell Colony Residency, Peterborough, NH.

  • Stella Ebner

    Cartier Christmas Window
    Stella Ebner

    Cartier Christmas Window is our feature this week, an exquisite screen print on Japanese paper made with no less than 36 ink colors. During its debut, it was selected for feature in the now retired print publication Art in Print for their Prix de Print series.

     

    We would like to share some of the writing of Faye Hirsch as she describes the successes of this work:

    "Before us is a shop window with a jewelry display. To either side, festoons of pine or tinsel hint at Christmas. Above is the brand: a logo unmistakably readable as Cartier, despite its being cut off at the top. Like any fancy Christmas window on Madison, this one includes a gimmick: a video, one presumes, of snow leopards - tinged with pink, like a glacier under the winter sun-bounding through an ice-blue background…Turquoise and violet shadows enhance the fluidity of the leopard action, as slightly off-register shadows and cartoon like sparkles give the jewels before them vivacity and allure….For its part Cartier Window brings to mind early lithographs by James Rosenquist or works in various mediums by Wayne Thiebaud-especially his woodcuts of a cake and candy apples produced in the 1980s at Crown Point Press in Kyoto with Tadashi Toda, a master of Ukiyo-e… Ebner pays homage to numerous art historical sources, but there is something quite contemporary in theses scenes  - all combining, the artist informs me, the flawed memory of real things seen and pure invention."

     

    Stella Ebner is Associate Professor of Art and Design and the Chair of the Printmaking Department at Purchase College SUNY, NY.  She earned her BFA from the University of Minnesota (1998) and her MFA in Printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design (2006). Ebner recently received a MI-LAB residency at Lake Kawaguchi, Japan, and has held residencies at Tamarind Institute, NM; the Lower East Side Printshop, NYC; Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts Studio Program, NYC; and Kala Art Institute, Berkeley, CA. Her work is in the collections of The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH; Minnesota Museum of American Art, St. Paul, MN; the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN; University of St. Thomas, MN; and the Kala Art Institute, Berkeley, CA, among others.

  • Allison Bianco

    Golden Hour
    Allison Bianco

    Golden Hour is Allison Bianco's most recent workcompleted in October of this year - an image that captures the magical time near sunset at the beach. The left part of the print is covered in a deep teal etching ink which is broken by the sun's low glow over First Beach in Middletown, Rhode Island. Waves crash by the rocks, and seagulls with shiny treasures, fly off to their nesting spots.

     

    Allison Bianco is a printmaker who primarily employs etching and screen printing in her work. Golden Hour was created using these processes with the addition of hot foil stamping. In this case, Bianco has applied two etching inks to the plate simultaneously, teal and golden yellow, to achieve the transition of day to night, indicating the moment of twilight. The gulls, clouds, fireworks, and vibrating sun are added over the etching ink with screen printing. Finally, holographic hot foil was stamped onto the print, highlighting the seagulls' prowess for collecting.

     

    Printed by Allison Bianco. Hot Foil Stamping by Lois Harada at DWRI Letterpress.

    6 prints available from the edition of 7!

     

    Allison Bianco received her MFA in Printmaking (2010) from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI and her BA in Studio Art (2001) from Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA. Bianco has recently been awarded a public art commission for New York City public school 671K in Brooklyn for a new, permanent site-specific artwork. Bianco is the recipient of a Visual Arts Sea Grant from the University of Rhode Island and her work was selected for a solo exhibition at The Print Center in Philadelphia as part of their 88th International Competition. Her work is in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA; Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA; The New York Public Library, NY; RISD Museum, RI; Yale University Art Gallery, CT; the University of San Diego, CA; and the Hawai'i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts, HI; among others.

  • Donnamaria Bruton

    R-Lily 2010, acrylic and collage on board, 36 x 36 inches

     

    We are delighted to focus on the work, R-Lily in this week's CT Feature.  The painting is a fantastical depiction of elements in nature. The central blue and white biomorphic cloud emerges from a body of delicately collaged white forms and lifts towards the green ferns in the upper part of the painting. Deeply spiritual and reverent, this painting is a beautiful gem-like work by the late Donnamaria Bruton.

     

    Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Donnamaria Bruton grew up in Detroit, and graduated from Michigan State University in 1976 where she earned her BFA in Graphic Design.  After graduation, Bruton continued her art career by studying art with her uncle, painter Edward Loper, Sr.  in Wilmington, Delaware.  During this time,  Bruton often visited the collection of art in the famous Barnes Foundation to study the collection. Founded by Albert C. Barnes in 1922, the collection holds some of the most seminal works by Matisse, Cézanne, Renoir and Modigliani as well as important examples of African sculpture.  Bruton's entree to the Barnes resulted in a lifelong reverence for the work of Pierre Bonnard, Henri Matisse and are among Bruton's greatest influences along with abstract painter Cy Twombly.

     

    Bruton continued her education and earned an MFA from Yale University in Painting and Printmaking in 1991. Between her MSU education and Yale, Bruton exhibited with pioneering African American gallerist Dell Pryor in Detroit. In 1993, she joined the Painting Department as Professor at the Rhode Island School of Design.  Donnamaria Bruton's work has been included in numerous one-person and group exhibitions throughout the United States, including an early solo exhibition at Woman and Their Work, Austin, Texas as well as exhibiting abroad in Canada, Japan, France and Korean Biennial.  Donnamaria Bruton's work is in the permanent collection of the Black Studies Gallery, University of Texas, Austin, Newport Art Museum, RISD Museum, Yale University Art Gallery and many private collections.

  • CT Feature

    One Artist. One Artwork. Highlights from the Vault.
    CT Feature

    We invite you to take a closer look at artworks by our gallery artists. Explore our CT Feature archive for videos and insights into the materials and processes behind these incomparable works of art.

  • Nancy Friese

    Fall Realm
    Nancy Friese

    Nancy Friese Fall Realm 2017, watercolor on paper, 22 x 30 inches

     

    Color is a power which directly influences the soul - Wassily Kandinsky

     

    During the past few weeks, at the tail end of fall leaf season in New England, intense golden yellows, deep coral reds and orange colors were intensified by the sun during the day.  Friese explores this phenomenon in her watercolor, Fall Realm. Through the view, there are hints of blue water, a few green leaves clinging to the branches, and an evergreen anchoring the right side of the scene, a reminder of  the power of nature.  Here soon, fall leaves will gather on the ground and the sculptural twists and turns of the empty tree branches will remain as a reminder of nature's incredible ability to adapt and change.  

     

    Not one artist is a keener observer of nature than the indisputably recognized American en plein air artist: Nancy Friese (b. 1948).  Friese paints oil paintings and watercolors as well as creating etchings, woodcuts and lithographs using her trained eye and first hand observation of nature. Trees, clouds, sky, grass, estuaries, rivers, ocean, rocks, and perhaps a path or a fence indicating human inhabitants, are all created with an astounding sense of color and movement. Both the long view and closer view works bring a joyous sense of spontaneity to the intricately detailed scenes.

     

    I am restored by being out of doors painting amid the swirling colors of fall. Nature lifts us out of the daily into the fantastic. - Nancy Friese

     

    During the long winter, may you have time to reflect on this work and keep in mind that the seasons will change and nature is our enduring reminder of life. Thank you for you your support of our gallery artists and for your interest in contemporary art.